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CES Unveiled 2017: Who needs a smart toothbrush?


CES 2017 kicked off with the show’s big CES Unveiled event on Jan. 3 and it featured a boatload of cool and interesting new gadgets for us to get our hands on. Oh, and there might have been a few duds along the way, but hey, they can’t all be winners.

But of the lot, these were some of the most eye-catching.

FridgeCam

The FridgeCam lets you know what’s in your fridge and when it’s about to expire.

No one likes opening their fridge to grab some milk for their coffee only to dump out a chunky, spoiled mess. And that’s exactly what the FridgeCam is designed to prevent.

The FridgeCam is a camera that sits inside your fridge and lets see what goodies you’ve got inside from anywhere in the world via a smartphone app. So if you’re heading home from work and want to know if you need to pick up some lettuce for your salad, you can jump on the FridgeCam app and get a live look at your fridge.

The app can also let you automatically add food to your online shopping list when it detects that food in your fridge is about to expire. You can also use it as a handy tool to figure out who’s eating all of your leftovers when you’re not at home.

Cosmo Connected

The Cosmo Connected is designed to help save motorcyclists lives.

Motorcyclists are especially vulnerable to accidents on the road, so to help prevent future incidents Cosmo Connected is rolling out its eponymous motorcycle helmet brake light.

The Cosmo Connected is an all-weather device that attaches to the back of your existing helmet and will automatically turn on when it detects that your motorcycle is slowing down. In fact, Cosmo’s parent company says the light can switch on even before your bike’s own brake lights do.

Most interesting is the fact that the Cosmo Connected can automatically alert emergency services when it detects that the helmet has been sitting horizontally for too long. The app also includes you medical profile so EMTs can have a better idea of how to treat you.

Cerevo Taclim

The Cerevo Taclim are the world-first VR shoes.

If you want to better feel the ground beneath your feet while playing VR games, the Cerevo Taclim is the extremely specific device you’ve been looking for.

Marketed as the world’s first VR shoes, the Taclim provides haptic feedback in the form of vibrations when you step over certain surfaces in VR worlds. I tested out the Taclim and it did provide feedback when walking over things like hard-packed snow, iron floors and wooden planks, but it was often slow to respond.

The Taclim also seeks to solve the issue of movement in VR by letting you move forward in games by walking in place. The idea is solid in theory, though, again, the shoes weren’t very responsive. I also question whether gamers would want to physically walk over incredibly long distances in games rather than just using a controller.

USens Fingo

The uSens Fingo is a hand-tracking device for your VR headset.

The uSens Fingo is a special attachment you strap to an existing virtual reality headset that can track your hand movements in real-time. It’s an interesting product and was highly accurate, though it seemed to have trouble picking up when I clasped my hands together or clapped them. Beyond that it was able to follow motions when I counted on my fingers, gave the thumbs up and made the O.K. gesture.

Kolibree Ara toothbrush

The Ara is the world’s first toothbrush with artificial intelligence.

What if your toothbrush wasn’t just plastic and bristles, but was actually intelligent? Well, that’s the idea behind Kolibree’s Ara. The company claims the Ara is the world’s first tootbrush with artificial intelligence and that it can detect where you brush the least and then help train you to brush their more frequently.

It’s an interesting concept if you’re into keeping your chompers feeling extra squeaky-clean and might even help improve your oral hygiene. Just remember, brush twice a day.

More of Yahoo Finance’s CES coverage:

Email Daniel at dhowley@yahoo-inc.com; follow him on Twitter at @DanielHowley.


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